11
Apr

Quote of the Day 

look-aat-prettybooks:

“So it turns out that late-night flashes of brilliance often look a little less brilliant in the bright light of morning.”

The Rules, Stacey Kade

Rated 5 Stars on Goodreads

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(Yes, I know I used another quote from this book fairly recently, but I honestly picked from my ‘liked’ Goodreads quotes at random.  And it was a great book.)

4
Mar
Congratulations to the fabulously talented Makiia Lucier. Her debut novel, A Death-Struck Year, is out today!
Two summers ago, I convinced Sarah Goldberg to be my assistant. It was just for the summer because she had to go back to Columbia in the fall for her doctorate (that slacker). I definitely got the better end of the deal. 

Sarah read the query for A Death-Struck Year and new she needed to request it for me. Then she read the novel and told me that I had to read it. She was, of course, right.

This novel is truly amazing. It’s beautifully written and incredibly poignant. 

Here’s the description:
In the grip of the deadly 1918 flu pandemic, not even the strong survive.The Spanish influenza is devastating the East Coast—but Cleo Berry knows it is a world away from the safety of her home in Portland, Oregon. Then the flu moves into the Pacific Northwest. Schools, churches, and theaters are shut down. The entire city is thrust into survival mode—and into a panic. Seventeen-year-old Cleo is told to stay put in her quarantined boarding school, but when the Red Cross pleads for volunteers, she cannot ignore the call for help. In the grueling days that follow her headstrong decision, she risks everything for near-strangers. Strangers like Edmund, a handsome medical student. Strangers who could be gone tomorrow. And as the bodies pile up, Cleo can’t help but wonder: when will her own luck run out? Riveting and well-researched, A Death-Struck Year is based on the real-life pandemic considered the most devastating in recorded world history, and leaves readers asking: what would I do for a neighbor? At what risk to myself?

Congratulations to the fabulously talented Makiia Lucier. Her debut novel, A Death-Struck Year, is out today!

Two summers ago, I convinced Sarah Goldberg to be my assistant. It was just for the summer because she had to go back to Columbia in the fall for her doctorate (that slacker). I definitely got the better end of the deal. 

Sarah read the query for A Death-Struck Year and new she needed to request it for me. Then she read the novel and told me that I had to read it. She was, of course, right.

This novel is truly amazing. It’s beautifully written and incredibly poignant. 

Here’s the description:


In the grip of the deadly 1918 flu pandemic, not even the strong survive.

The Spanish influenza is devastating the East Coast—but Cleo Berry knows it is a world away from the safety of her home in Portland, Oregon. Then the flu moves into the Pacific Northwest. Schools, churches, and theaters are shut down. The entire city is thrust into survival mode—and into a panic. 

Seventeen-year-old Cleo is told to stay put in her quarantined boarding school, but when the Red Cross pleads for volunteers, she cannot ignore the call for help. In the grueling days that follow her headstrong decision, she risks everything for near-strangers. Strangers like Edmund, a handsome medical student. Strangers who could be gone tomorrow. And as the bodies pile up, Cleo can’t help but wonder: when will her own luck run out? 

Riveting and well-researched, A Death-Struck Year is based on the real-life pandemic considered the most devastating in recorded world history, and leaves readers asking: what would I do for a neighbor? At what risk to myself?

3
Mar

I have two fabulous sequels coming out tomorrow!

Mindee Arnett’s The Nightmare Dilemma, which might be even better than her debut (The Nightmare Affair) is out tomorrow.

As is Kara Taylor’s Wicked Little Secrets the follow up to the fabulous Prep School Confidential (and let me say that Anne Dowling is my fictional best friend.

2
Feb

He was right. The sudden shock of metal against my skin made me gasp.

I started to shiver for real, then, and Zane stepped closer, looping his free arm around my shoulders in the front, a backwards sort of hug, while his other hand kept the magnet between us.

"Better?" he asked.

I could feel the rise and fall of his chest against me, the softness of his shirt on my skin, and, faintly, the solid and reassuring beat of his heart.

I wanted to cry, to turn around and bury my head against him. To cling to him, to crawl inside. Instead, I cleared my throat and said, “Yes.”

— Mini-excerpt from THE HUNT (Book 2 in the Project Paper Doll series), out on April 22, 2014! (via staceykade)