10
Mar

Ask Me Anything: The Submission Process 

Recently I got a question on tumblr about submissions and what the process is like. It’s a rather lengthy answer so I figured I’d talk about it here. 

Once a writer signs with an agent—and after they go through any revisions, be it a polish or a more lengthy edit—the next step is going on submission.

In short, this means their agent will submit the manuscript (fiction) or proposal (non-fiction) to editors. 

What this means…

I can only speak for myself, but the process actually starts when I first sign a new client. During my first read, before I’ve even decided whether I should represent a project, I’ll be thinking about submission. Obviously, if I’m thinking ahead, I’m thinking how much I love the story, but I’m also thinking about which editors will love the manuscript as well. 

After I sign an author, I make up a spreadsheet with the Publisher, Imprint, and Editor.

(This sheet is blank because it’s fake, and I’m using these editors because I work with them on recently released books—Nightingale’s Nest by Nikki Loftin, A Snicker of Magic by Natalie Lloyd, and A Death-Struck Year by Makiia Lucier). 

I think about what imprints are the right fit for the book and what editors at those imprints would fall in love the manuscript like I have. (One of the things I have to keep in mind is the different rules of submitting to each house—like you can’t submit to two editors at the same imprint and some house you can submit to multiple imprints and some you can’t.)

Then when the manuscript is all ready and polished, I pitch the manuscript to each of the editors on the list. Pitching could mean calling or talking to them in person if we have drinks or lunch or if I know them really well and we’ve worked together before, I might send an email.

After I pitch the project, ideally an editor will be as excited as I am and ask to see it. In that case I’d send them the manuscript with a written pitch (sort of like a query). If the editor isn’t interested (maybe they just signed something similar), I would call and pitch to someone else instead. 

Once the manuscript is with everyone on my list, it’s officially on submission

But that isn’t the end of the process. 

I’d love to say that I always hear back within a few weeks but that isn’t true. Just like writers wait for agents to respond at the querying stage, we agents have to wait for editors to read and respond. Sometimes it happens quickly (there are times when I’ve gotten responses in a week or less!) but other times it takes weeks even months. 

This is where following up comes in. 

I follow up with editors (how soon after submission is based on the project or if there’s any news and also based on what’s happening in life or in publishing). This reminds them how much I love the project and makes sure the ms doesn’t slip through the cracks.

When responses come in, I usually ask the author how they want me to handle it. Do they want to see the responses or do they want me to just tell them about it or do they only want to hear from me when I have good news, etc.

Once the book is on submission, there are a variety of different possible outcomes:

An Auction: This is where multiple editors are making offers. 

(It’s not like an auction at an auction house or anything. It’s largely done over email). I’ll set a date and a time, and ask every editors to get me their first bid—or offer—by then. Once all the bids are in, I’ll go back to all the under bidders and ask for more and that will keep going until we have the best bid from each house. I’ve had auctions with two houses that last one round and I had an auction once that was seven houses and a different auction that lasted a week long. 

Auctions can be stressful for everyone involved, but they also leave room for a lot of choice on the author’s part. It’s about more than just advance. Royalties, pub schedule, rights granted, the editor’s vision for the book, etc—all of these are factors that I’ll discuss with an author before the author makes his/her decision about what offer to accept. (I’ll give my opinion/advise, but it’s always the author’s decision).

A Pre-Empt: This is where an editor makes a “offer you can’t refuse.” 

Sometimes the editor might be the only editor to see the project. Other times they’re just so excited about it that they come in with an offer before anyone else. Pre-empt offers are often higher or better than a first bid for an auction, but that doesn’t mean that all pre-empts are huge. A quiet literary middle grade for instance isn’t going to get the same advance as a huge commercial YA novel. But the reasons to accept a pre-empt are usually that it’s the best offer including advance and terms and the editor’s and publisher’s enthusiasm.

An Offer

This is the most common positive outcome—it only takes one!

In all three of these cases, as an agent, I’m doing a lot of negotiation. And again, the advance is one of those negotiating points but royalties, publication schedule, subrights splits, rights granted, etc are things that I’m asking about. Sometimes I’m even asking for specific language to be in the contract a later date.

No Offer

Hopefully this isn’t the outcome, but it does happen—more than you’d think. We all announce the manuscripts that do sell, but we don’t announce the ones that don’t. If there isn’t an offer, I usually work with the author to revise and do another round of submission or I work with the author on their next project. 

16
Dec

Suzie’s favorite (Non-New Leaf) reads of 2013 

I read over a hundred books during the course of 2013—in addition to my own clients’ books of course. Some of them are books that came out this year and others came out a while ago. 

Here are my top ten favorite non New Leaf books. Each of these books are ones that I could read fast enough. A few of them had me up all night. All of them were on my mind long after I stopped reading. If any of them are books you haven’t read, you should.

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Summer and Bird

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Night Film

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The Darkest Minds

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The Duchess War

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Beautiful Bastard

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It Happened One Autumn

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Blue-Eyed Devil

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Sharp Objects

Hyperbole and a Half

What are your favorite reads from this past year? I’d love to have more recommendations for next year!

10
Dec

Example Query: Rebecca Behrens 

In March, a few years ago, I got a fabulous query by Rebecca Behrens for her debut novel. I knew within just the first few lines that I had to read this book.

Here’s the query:

Dear Ms. Townsend, 

fump • \fəmp\ v. 1 slang a dump or desert one’s (platonic) friend ‘Keisha made the swim team so now she is totally going to fump Annie’ b get rid of unceremoniously ‘poor thing got fumped by her best friend’ c friend-dumped.

Think there’s nothing worse than getting dumped? Try getting fumped—at least when it’s some guy who’s breaking your heart, you can rely on your best friend for a shoulder to cry on and emergency fro-yo trips. When it’s said friend who’s doing the deserting, who can you turn to for support? Your pet hamster? Your parentals? In my young-adult novel Fumped (71,924 words), whip-smart sophomore Jocelyn Heller holds nothing back as she retells the story of how she got fumped by her best friend. 

Jocelyn and Alexis have been best friends their whole lives, although they’ve grown into two very different peas sharing a pod. By the start of sophomore year, however, Alexis has ditched Jocelyn to hang out with the popular, vapid Lacey and her soccer-playing boyfriend. Jocelyn is desperate to prove to her best friend that she can fit in with the new crowd, despite the fact that she cares more for books than for booze and has never had a boyfriend. Yet all of Jocelyn’s efforts to win back Alexis’s favor only lead to more cruel exclusions. Gradually, Jocelyn realizes that she’s more suited to new friends from her Art Metal class and the drama club (including the crush-worthy Peter) and that perhaps the BFF she’s fighting for isn’t really deserving of her loyalty and friendship. Equal parts introspective and angst-y, witty and heartbreaking, Jocelyn shows how getting fumped was both the worst thing that could happen to her and possibly the best. 

Fumped is my debut YA novel, and yes—I once had firsthand experience with the subject matter. I also have a BA from Northwestern University and an MA in Comparative Literature from the Graduate Center (CUNY). I’m currently a textbook editor at Macmillan/McGraw-Hill in New York City, where I have focused on literature products for grades K-12. I am a freelance writer and have been published in American Cheerleader magazine, which has a readership of 1.2 million and is targeted toward the teen athlete, and its business publication, Cheer Biz News. I’m also an active member of the Association of American Publishers’ Young to Publishing networking group, through which I have formed relationships with editors at Knopf-Doubleday, Dial Books for Young Readers, and Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. 

I look forward to sharing Jocelyn’s story with you, and I know you’ll love her as much as I do. Hers is a fresh and quirky voice, and she tells her story with humor and raw emotion. Getting fumped might have sucked really hard, but you’ll see that it gave Jocelyn the catalyst she needed to start being herself. The first five pages of Fumped follow this query and the full manuscript is available upon request. Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions. 

Thank you for your time and consideration,

Rebecca Behrens

Now, here’s what I love about it.

Fumped. It’s a fabulous concept and term and I loved how Rebecca defined it before the query. It drew me in immediately, let me know what the story was going to be about—but it did so in a creative way. 

I also love the beginning of the query—that first paragraph has such a fabulous voice and is a (rare) example of rhetorical questions that work really well. (Trust me, I normally hate them). Right then and there it won me over and I requested it. 

Once I’d requested the novel, I read and loved it and offered Rebecca representation. Unfortunately at the time, Fumped was a little too sweet for contemporary YA (which was a pretty tough market), but Rebecca when on to write When Audrey Met Alice which we sold to Sourcebooks and comes out in February.

It’s a different story but it has the same fabulous writing and humor that I loved about Fumped.

6
Nov

New Deal Announced! 

Paranormal:
Abigail Baker’s debut novel DEATHMARK, featuring the last Scrivener, a young woman who works for the Grim Reapers, marking humans who have cheated death, until she must mark her only human friend to Danielle Poiesz at Entangled with Allison Blisard editing, in a three book deal, by Suzie Townsend at New Leaf Literary & Media.
Congratulations Abby!
5
Nov

Example Query: Makiia Lucier 

I’ve said it before, but I owe a lot to Sarah Goldberg. The same summer that she found the fabulously talented Mindee Arnett and Sara Polsky in my slush pile, she also found Makiia Lucier.

Now, historical YA is actually pretty tough. It’s tough to get the teenage sensibility just right while also staying true to the historical time period. As a result, I was wary of historical YA. I wasn’t opposed to it, but it wasn’t something I was looking for either. For me to take on a historical project it would have to be something with amazing characters and really great plot and outstanding writing.

Then I got this query and Sarah said to me, “How are you feeling about YA historical…?” I took a look and told her I was feeling good about this one.

Here’s the query:

Dear Ms. Townsend:

In the fall of 1918, Cleo Berry is completing her studies at St. Helen’s Hall, one of the oldest boarding schools in Portland, Oregon. When soldiers arrive at nearby Camp Lewis, they transport the Spanish Influenza, a mysterious strain of flu that strikes down young men and women with swift, shocking brutality.

Schools, churches, and theaters are shut down. Cleo disobeys her headmistress’s quarantine order, choosing to wait out the epidemic, and her family’s impending return, in the relative safety of their empty home. But it isn’t long before the Red Cross launches a plea for volunteers. For deeply personal reasons, Cleo finds she cannot ignore the call for help.

Her duties are clear-to search the neighborhoods and report cases of influenza to the grand auditorium, which has been transformed into an emergency hospital. There Cleo meets Lieutenant Edmund Parrish, a medical student who bears the permanent scars of war. In the coming weeks, the death toll mounts, and reality sets in. There is little help forthcoming from an overworked medical staff and a strained ambulance service. If Cleo is to help save lives, she must find the courage to navigate alone in a city turned ominous with fear.

A BEAUTIFUL AND DEATH STRUCK YEAR is a young adult historical novel, complete at 56,000 words.

My articles have appeared in the Portland Oregonian, Bookmarks Magazine, and Library Journal. I have a BA in journalism from the University of Oregon and an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where I studied literature for children. Additionally, I am a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.

I have attached my complete manuscript. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Makiia Lucier

Here’s what I loved about it:

First Spanish Influenza! I love that this is a time period I haven’t seen too many times before, but at the same time there’s a high stakes backdrop. (And can I say that when I read this for the first time, I was constantly freaking out when someone sneezed next to me on the subway.

I also was really struck by the writing and pacing in this query. Makiia introduces the stakes (the flu that kills!) and then she sets up Cleo’s personal experience with it in a way that gradually built the sense of urgency. I felt so grabbed by the “personal reasons” (why would she put herself in danger!?) and this Lieutenant with scars of war (I admit I sort of love a guy with emotion baggage—at least in books).

I read the manuscript and loved it. There were parts that made me weep and of course, Edmund is rather swoony, and Cleo…I just loved her.

I wasn’t the only one. I sold this to Harcourt Childrens. They dropped the “Beautiful” from the title and the book comes out in March, and it’s one of the ABA picks for New Voices. Here’s where you can add it to goodreads.

1
Oct

Example Query: Natalie Lloyd 

It was a little over a year ago that the super talented Natalie Lloyd first queried me. Now here’s what’s interesting. She knew one of my other super talented writers (the fabulous Sarah Wylie) who had referred her to me (and written me an email to tell me how much she loved Natalie and her novel).

But I read the query on a day when I had a lot of them and was cruising through and skipping ahead to the book description. So it actually wasn’t until I knew I needed to request this, that I went back and read the first paragraph and realized this was a book I’d already been warned was good.

Here’s the query:

Dear Ms. Townsend,

I adore your blog Confessions of a Wandering Heart. Your posts encourage me, challenge me, and frequently lead to impulse book purchases. (As an aside, I love that you kept the Reem Acra dress.) In researching your interests, I was excited to see that you are still acquiring middle-grade fiction. Your client, Sarah Wylie, suggested I query you with my manuscript, There’s Magic in Midnight Gulch.

When 12-year-old Felicity Pickle moves to Midnight Gulch, she’s certain this rainy mountain town will be as boring as every other city she’s kicked her sneakers through. But she’s wrong. Felicity soon discovers Midnight Gulch’s not-so-secret-secret: years ago, the people who lived in these hills had magic in their veins. They could churn memories into ice cream and trap shadows in books. They could sing up rainstorms and hide inside paintings. When Felicity hears the tale of The Brothers Threadbare, Midnight Gulch’s most notorious and most tragic family, she realizes this strange mountain magic might have everything to do with her own family’s misfortune.

With a little help from her new friends (including Jonah Pickett, an anonymous do-gooder who refers to himself as The Beedle), and a newfound confidence in her own peculiar ability, Felicity sets out to break a century-old curse, bring back the magic, and finally find a home for her wandering heart. There’s Magic in Midnight Gulch is complete at 55,000 words. I have also completed a middle-grade novel called Silverswift; about a grandmother, her granddaughter, a secret map and a feisty mermaid. Silverswift is complete at 50,000 words.

I have a degree in Journalism and currently work in non-fiction and freelance, writing mostly for a small (and incredible) readership of teen girls. I live in Chattanooga, Tennessee and am the proud owner of a highly excitable dog, a breezy southern drawl, and a room full of well-loved books.

Per your specifications, I have included the first five pages of my novel within this email. I would love to send you the rest if you are interested. Regardless, thank you for taking the time to review my query.

All the Best,
Natalie

Here’s what I love about it:

Um everything! No but really, if I had to go into specifics, the first one is that it’s easy to tell just from the query that Natalie possesses a talent for stringing words together to make sentences. 

I know that write from the first line of the book description (When 12-year-old Felicity Pickle moves to Midnight Gulch, she’s certain this rainy mountain town will be as boring as every other city she’s kicked her sneakers through.) From that line I have such a clear image of Felicity. The choice to use “kicked her sneakers through” is such a powerful but also original image. And of course, it’s not the only great sentence in the query.

Another thing I really like about this query is the way that Natalie mentioned her other novel, Silverswift. It doesn’t feel like she’s pitching me two novels—instead it feels like she’s just letting me know that she’s got another book too. It’s just a title and one line about it, but it implies she’s serious about a career in writing, and of course, I like that.

I wasn’t the only one to love Natalie, this book (or this pitch—which I tweaked when writing my pitch letter). This novel sold at auction over the summer and even the editors who were delirious enough to pass raved about how fabulous it was.

Now the title has changed to A Snicker of Magic and it will be released from Scholastic 2/25/2014.

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5
Sep

New Deal! 

If you’re a new adult fan, you’re going to love this:

Fiction: New Adult

Author of the self-published bestselling Archers of Avalon trilogy, Chelsea Fine’s first new adult novel, BEST KIND OF BROKEN, featuring a college sophomore who takes a summer job working at Willow Inn for the free room and board, only to discover too late that her free room shares a hallway and a bathroom with the only guy she was hoping to avoid for the rest of her life to Megha Parekh at Forever Yours, in a significant deal, in a three book deal, at auction, by Suzie Townsend at New Leaf Literary & Media (NA).

23
Aug

Who’s in the mood for a query contest? 

It’s August, I’m back from vacation, and I think the end of 2013 is going to be even better than the beginning. 

So my question to you is: Can you handle the truth?

Many writers want to know what an agent is really thinking when they pass on a query, right? You want the truth…but can you handle it? Well next week I will respond to the queries I receive in complete honesty. I will either request your manuscript or I will pass and tell you exactly why.
No form responses.
Now, this isn’t a critique, it’s just an honest response, but if you’ve been getting a lot of form rejections, this might tell you why. (hopefully it’ll be helpful?)
You may see something as simple as “Not bad, but just not for me.” or “I don’t represent legal thrillers.” or “Mermaids creep me out.” OR you may see something like “I stopped reading when you mentioned that the mailman was a vampire space zombie who has come to deliver a message of PAIN. Because come on…seriously?”

So, if you want the truth, query me for the next week (so right now until 10 am EST on Friday 8/30). Read on for the rules.

Rules:
  • Queries must be submitted to Query(at)newleafliterary(dot)com. 
  • All queries entered must have this in the subject line: QUERY SUZIE - I can handle the truth
  • If it does not have this in the subject line, it will be considered a regular query only.
  • Queries must be in the body of the email. NO attachments!
  • Queries should include the first 5-10 pages of your manuscript in the body of your email below your query. 
  • You will receive our usual auto-response. If you do not receive an auto-response, resend!
  • One query per writer please. (Don’t think you can trick me with different email addresses either)
I will respond to all queries entered in the contest by Tuesday (9/3/2013) at 5pm EST.


Further Guidelines:
  • Yes, if you’ve already been rejected by me (or someone else at New Leaf) you may resubmit your query. I will read (if submitted in the correct time frame) and let you know why it’s been rejected. Don’t say “You already rejected me…” Treat it like you’ve never queried her before.
  • Your queries will NOT be posted on this or any other blog. I will reply to you via your e-mail, only. 
  • You must treat this as an actual query process, which means you need to have a complete manuscript. If I do request your manuscript, I don’t want to find out there isn’t one!
Okay, ready go!