14
Oct
Happy pub day to Sara Raasch for her debut, SNOW LIKE ASHES! Riveting and unique, this fantasy novel will keep you hooked and wanting more. Good thing it’s a trilogy!

Happy pub day to Sara Raasch for her debut, SNOW LIKE ASHES! Riveting and unique, this fantasy novel will keep you hooked and wanting more. Good thing it’s a trilogy!

14
Oct
Happy pub day to Dan Krokos! THE BLACK STARS is the sequel to THE PLANET THIEVES, a middle grade sci-fi action and adventure novel that will keep you intrigued from page one. You should believe Eoin Colfer, who praises this book as “a riveting story”!

Happy pub day to Dan Krokos! THE BLACK STARS is the sequel to THE PLANET THIEVES, a middle grade sci-fi action and adventure novel that will keep you intrigued from page one. You should believe Eoin Colfer, who praises this book as “a riveting story”!

13
Oct
Do literary agents handle comic-like pamphlets, like Marvel and others?
— Anonymous

Some literary agents represent illustrators and graphic novelists who may work in comic books. 

13
Oct
Is there a list somewhere of all the Imprints of each of the big Publishers? I look at my bookshelf and see more Henry Holt, Bantam Press and Hyperion on the spines than Harper Collins, Random House, etc. and I get confused about who is what. Also, apart from specializing in things, what's the advantage/function of imprints?
— Anonymous

I’m going to suggest you wikipedia the major publishers for a list of their individual imprints. Here’s one: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Random_House

Often times, imprints have an identity in the kinds of books they do. This comes from back in the day when certain imprints only did hardcover books or only did paperbacks or even further back when they were small publishers by themselves until they got gobbled up and became part of a bigger publishers. 

For instance looking at that Random House imprint list. Knopf is known for literary fiction whereas Del Rey is known for science fiction and fantasy. 

Now how does this come into play?

This business is still pretty small. A lot of it is still based on personal connections. Imprints often have their own publicity and marketing team or could even have their own their own sales force.

13
Oct
I remember Suzie always states that she keeps reading a manuscript if the first line catches her, then the second, the third, and so on. I don't know if I should take this literally, but if you come across a line that needs work, do you stop there even if you were interested in what was before? Are you willing to forgive that single line (or lines) and keep going?
— Anonymous

This is a good question. I do say this a lot. I wasn’t the first agent to say it. I heard it from a wiser more experienced agent on a panel back when I was a baby agent. 

So here are my thoughts. 

You do have to take that literally…to a point. For the first 25-50 pages or more until I’m hooked, each line really has to grab and hold onto me. 

Once I’m hooked, I can overlook things and keep reading. 

Now, here’s the thing. When you mention a “line that needs work” though, it makes me think we might be talking about different things. 

When I mention that the first line catches me, I’m not talking mechanics. I’m talking voice and storytelling. 

Have you seen this?

I started reading that manuscript on a Sunday afternoon. I could not stop. Even though the manuscript turned out to be 168k words. It had some issues. I gave some notes. There was probably a typo or two. But the voice and the storytelling had me by the end of the first chapter. There was no way I was going to stop reading. 

13
Oct
Are there any "special rules" that come with representing an under-18 author? Do you represent them at all?
— Anonymous

Yes, a parent or guardian has to co-sign legal documents like agency agreements or publishing contracts.

The lovely and talented Kody Keplinger was under 18 when her agent sold The Duff I believe. So yes.

13
Oct
Several agents have had my full manuscript for a month now. I haven't heard anything, and I'm worried it's a bad sign. My CPs insist they haven't read it yet. If you read a MS and don't love it, do you contact the author right away?
— Anonymous

No news is actually just no news.

It’s not good or bad. Try to focus on something else. I get that it’s easier said than done, but your CPs are right.

13
Oct
Do you think there's a place in the NA market for later-year college stories (like, a 21 year old or a millenial dreading the real world) that doesn't focus on the steaminess factor, but more quirky humor in the vein of Rainbow Rowell a la Fangirl? Or does the market seem set on a hot romance-heavy bend?
— Anonymous

In terms of the market right now, steamy is where it’s at. 

If you write literary fiction that is as poignant as Rainbow Rowell then you can be an exception.

13
Oct
If you sent out a full to an agent and never received a confirmation receipt, should I assume they have it? What's the appropriate time frame/way of going about asking if they actually received it without seeming like a nag?
— Anonymous

Urgh, I don’t know. Not everyone sends a confirmation receipt. I think you have to trust that they received it. Then in 60 days you can send a polite follow up email.

13
Oct
Writing YA set in real place. How literal must I be? I fictionalized names of cafes, streets, etc. But there's a major university there and it's in my story. How specific/accurate must I be w/name of university, buildings, policies?
dlak

It’s totally up to you. That’s the beauty of fiction.

13
Oct
Which agent at New Leaf do you think would be best for a kind of dark, gothic thriller in the vein of Gillian Flynn's earlier works? (Sharp Places, namely.)
— Anonymous

Suzie. She is a HUGE Sharp Objects and Dark Places fan.

13
Oct
I've sent a query to your office. It got rejected. But I reworked it. Can I resend?
— Anonymous

Yes.

13
Oct
Hello I have a book where the MC is 18.5/19 and is in college would this be considered as New Adult? Also would anyone at New Leaf take on this sort of book?
— Anonymous

Yes. Suzie.

13
Oct
I'm not sure if you guys could help, but how would you go about getting an editing internship? I am a sophomore in college going for a English and Creative Writing double major with a Religion minor, and it seems very hard to find any summer internships for anything in the publishing world! Is there any things you guys would suggest doing or trying? I would appreciate it very much.
— Anonymous

A number of the major publishers offer summer internships for credit. Check out their websites. Also check out bookjobs.com. That’s where I found out about my internship.