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This Friday marks the final one of Summer 2014. Next Friday we’ll have officially begun Fall—are you ready? I am. Leaves changing colors, apple picking, coats and boots…that’s my kind of season. I’d like it if I had a fire place to cozy up next to, but I’ll have to settle for the smell of burning dust for the first few days of the heat kicking on in the upcoming months.

But beyond looking forward to that little bit of NYC bliss, we’re also reading some great books this fall.

Danielle is reading THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN WITCHES by Lauren Magaziner, which she read as a manuscript at her internship almost three years ago!

Joanna is reading (and loving) ENGINES OF THE BROKEN WORLD by Jason Vanhee.

Mackenzie is starting BAD FEMINIST by Roxane Gay.

Suzie is reading the new Tana French novel, THE SECRET PLACE.

Jackie is picking up THE INFINITE SEA, Rick Yancey’s sequel to THE FIFTH WAVE.

Jess and Jaida are still immersed in GONE GIRL by Gillian Flynn.

Pouya and Kathleen are reading manuscripts.

So enjoy your final weekend of summer and get ready for the sweet season of fall!

18
Sep
Hello, there! I'm looking to be a book editor here in the very near future and I was wondering how the process works for you all to find or work with editors? If you do locate them yourself, what do you look for in one? Thanks for your time and information!
deadp--l

We don’t really usually work with freelance editors—I’d say we do most of our editing in house. As in I edit my clients’ work. Then of course we sell it to an editor at the publishing house—if all goes well. 

The freelance editors we have worked with are often former editors who are now doing freelance work because we know them and are knowledgable about their credentials. 

So I’m not sure an agency is going to be your target audience. I think there are a lot of great freelance opportunities if you’re working with authors getting ready for submission or authors who want to self-publish.

18
Sep
It’s time for another Three Question Thursday with one of our fantastic clients. Here to introduce the illustrious Megan Kimble is her agent, Mackenzie Brady:
It’s not an exaggeration to say that working with Megan Kimble, author of the upcoming UNPROCESSED: My Busy, Broke, City-dwelling Year of Reclaiming Food (William Morrow, 2015), has changed my life. I was raised in a no-sugar, no-junk-food, all-organic-before-that-was-a-thing household. Needless to say, I eventually fell WAY off the wagon when I discovered ice cream as a teenager. Megan helped bring me back. She reminded me, in her perfectly charming and intelligent way, that eating food - real, natural sustenance - is paramount to a person’s health and also to the health of our communities and food system as a whole. She’s been an inspiration to me and I’m sure to many others. On that note, take it away Megan!
Tell Us a Fact About What You’re Working on Now
What I’m working on now is wine. Really. I’m editing Unprocessed and updating a chapter about the process of alcohol. Did you know the word fermentation comes from the Latin, fervere, which means to boil? So when fermenting—when making mead or brewing beer—look for bubbles.
What’s Something People Might Be Surprised to Learn About You?
I love puns. In a big way.


 
What’s One Of Your Favorite Books (and Why)?
This month, in nonfiction, it’s Dan Barber’s The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food. I’d seen both of his TED talks before I read the book, and the feel of reading it was similar—it was like he was there in the room with me, talking away. His voice got stuck in my head. There were a few moments when I was researching Unprocessed that I felt like everything in our food system was broken and there was nothing we could do about it. That, of course, is so not true, and Barber’s book reminded me that there’s still so much to be excited about—so many stories that are still unfolding.
Can I have a fiction book, too? Thanks. It’s Donna Tart’s The Goldfinch, which absolutely consumed my life this summer—I dreamed about it, emailed about it, and missed it when it was gone.
What has been your favorite place you’ve ever visited?
Before I went to graduate school, I lived in Recife, Brazil for two months. I went there with the sole purpose of learning how to speak Portuguese—my bucket-list language. I did Rosetta Stone Portuguese before I left and arrived knowing how to say, “The woman is eating rice” and, “The apple is red.” So, right. Tricky arrival. But then I found roommates and a little room in a little apartment; then I found a five-day a week Portuguese class located three blocks from the beach. Recife itself is a sprawling, crowded city, but that little classroom is still one of my favorite places in the world—the Atlantic ocean blocks away, blue peeking through skyscrapers, and me reveling in the delight of Portuguese—its bursts of excitement, the tes and des pronounced “tche” and “dgee” (ci-dad-dgee) the long o in ótimo (tá oootimo!), the infernal plural “çoes” that I never learned how to pronounce. Learning for learning’s sake. 

It’s time for another Three Question Thursday with one of our fantastic clients. Here to introduce the illustrious Megan Kimble is her agent, Mackenzie Brady:

It’s not an exaggeration to say that working with Megan Kimble, author of the upcoming UNPROCESSED: My Busy, Broke, City-dwelling Year of Reclaiming Food (William Morrow, 2015), has changed my life. I was raised in a no-sugar, no-junk-food, all-organic-before-that-was-a-thing householdNeedless to say, I eventually fell WAY off the wagon when I discovered ice cream as a teenager. Megan helped bring me back. She reminded me, in her perfectly charming and intelligent way, that eating food - real, natural sustenance - is paramount to a person’s health and also to the health of our communities and food system as a whole. She’s been an inspiration to me and I’m sure to many others. On that note, take it away Megan!

Tell Us a Fact About What You’re Working on Now

What I’m working on now is wine. Really. I’m editing Unprocessed and updating a chapter about the process of alcohol. Did you know the word fermentation comes from the Latin, fervere, which means to boil? So when fermenting—when making mead or brewing beer—look for bubbles.

What’s Something People Might Be Surprised to Learn About You?

I love puns. In a big way.

 

What’s One Of Your Favorite Books (and Why)?

This month, in nonfiction, it’s Dan Barber’s The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food. I’d seen both of his TED talks before I read the book, and the feel of reading it was similar—it was like he was there in the room with me, talking away. His voice got stuck in my head. There were a few moments when I was researching Unprocessed that I felt like everything in our food system was broken and there was nothing we could do about it. That, of course, is so not true, and Barber’s book reminded me that there’s still so much to be excited about—so many stories that are still unfolding.

Can I have a fiction book, too? Thanks. It’s Donna Tart’s The Goldfinch, which absolutely consumed my life this summer—I dreamed about it, emailed about it, and missed it when it was gone.

What has been your favorite place you’ve ever visited?

Before I went to graduate school, I lived in Recife, Brazil for two months. I went there with the sole purpose of learning how to speak Portuguese—my bucket-list language. I did Rosetta Stone Portuguese before I left and arrived knowing how to say, “The woman is eating rice” and, “The apple is red.” So, right. Tricky arrival. But then I found roommates and a little room in a little apartment; then I found a five-day a week Portuguese class located three blocks from the beach. Recife itself is a sprawling, crowded city, but that little classroom is still one of my favorite places in the world—the Atlantic ocean blocks away, blue peeking through skyscrapers, and me reveling in the delight of Portuguese—its bursts of excitement, the tes and des pronounced “tche” and “dgee” (ci-dad-dgee) the long o in ótimo (tá oootimo!), the infernal plural “çoes” that I never learned how to pronounce. Learning for learning’s sake.