20
Aug
Is New Leaf currently accepting applications for non-student internships? If so , where can I apply?
— Anonymous

Email Danielle Barthel at assist@newleafliterary.com

20
Aug
Hello. I recently heard that trends are not as important as the particular novel. I wrote a YA sci-fi that I queried pretty widely (maybe about 40 agents or less), received about four requests and maybe 5-7 more personal rejections (You're talented but sci-fi with even a wiff of dystopian is hard sell, comments of that nature). I've did some edits (more so technical) but now I'm working on a YA fantasy. Should I try to requery the sci fi?
— Anonymous

So yes, the particular novel is the most important thing. 

But a lot of people are over YA SF at the moment and it didn’t sell that well when it was a hot thing. You can still requery while you work on your fantasy though!

20
Aug
Would anyone at new leaf be interested in a YA similar to Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult?
— Anonymous

Yes. Suzie. SHE LOVED NINETEEN MINUTES

20
Aug
I'm cleaning up my first book YA Fantasy to query, and trying to decide what to work on next. I have several ideas all as compelling to me as each other, so no 'choose the one you like the most'. One if a Norse Myth trilogy from the POV of a young Loki as an anti-hero. One the one hand, thats a quite fashionable story thanks to the Marvel movies, but then are you seeing a lot of submissions like that for those same reasons? I'm as happy to work on that or another project. Any advice?
— Anonymous

I would not work on the norse myth—I’ve seen a lot of those lately and honestly, they feel a little too close to paranormal. I think it would be a really tough sell—especially if it feels similar to the recent Marvel movies.

20
Aug
I think I've read a post about multiple Q's for different ms sent simultaneously. (And agents not liking it). In another format (writer based), I read--go for it. Why? Because writers are the 1st advocate for their work, and two, the query process is slow + capricious. If the worst case scenario is having to choose between two agents or stories, what's the downsize?
— Anonymous

To me it feels unprofessional and tells me the writer isn’t very patient. If I did this to editors they wouldn’t want to work with me.

There’s a chance that when an agent offers on one manuscript, agents who don’t have that one will bow out rather than read it. Because you want the agents to be offering on the same book—what if one book is better to start with?

I just think you should spend time revising and give the first ms a shot, and if it doesn’t have takers, then move onto the new one. But you’re the one querying.

20
Aug
Really tough to feel optimistic through the Query Process when you feel like the Whack-a-Mole...(even when you have a great support crew, go on to the next project, and remember to write for the love of it). Because really, just writing for the love of it = a diary. Writing for the love of it, yes, but also, to be published + read. Whack-on.
— Anonymous

I could be supportive here, but it sounds like you have that, so I’m going to go for the tough love approach.

Yes. This is a hard business. The truth is, the query process is only the tip of the iceberg in terms of “tough.” 

Get used to it now. Focus on what you can control. Decide how bad you really want it and try not to let things get you down.

20
Aug
I read so much about the writer's need to work the publicity angle (when published), regarding book signings, travel--etcetera. But what if the writer is herself, a person has a disability (not shyness), making those kinds of things truly...difficult?
— Anonymous

Be upfront about this when you sign with an agent. There are other things you can do.

20
Aug
I am a young writer who writes YA. The book I am getting ready to query is an MS that deals with real issues teens faces and I could really relate to my characters because we are the same age. Should mention that while querying?
— Anonymous

Yes, in your bio!

20
Aug
My ms is a high fantasy, features a 14-year-old mc and is complete at 55,000 words. I personally think it straddles the line between upper MG and YA. The voice tends more towards YA while the plot-drivenness indicates MG. Should I add some chapters to make the word count appropriate for YA or simply query it as a MG/YA hybrid as it is?
— Anonymous

Querying as MG/YA is a mistake. I read that and I’m likely to pass because that’s not a thing in traditional publishing.

If your plot is MG you should make your character 13, do a pass to revise your voice so it doesn’t sound too old (read an upper MG book first) and then query as MG.

20
Aug
I entered Pitch wars ,but i had a question. Should I hold off on querying because of it (Assuming i make it to the mentor stage ) .A lot of my dream agents/agency's (including NL of course) are involved in pitch wars and they (you) are who I plan to query.
— Anonymous

Sure. Hold off, get some good advice—or even read the pitches (if you don’t make it that far) and revise accordingly. 

There’s no rush.

20
Aug
Do the assistants of New Leaf list their wishlist/ taste in books anywhere?
— Anonymous

No. They’re not taking queries yet. 

20
Aug
My current MS is a YA contemp that deals with serious issues, but the first half is MUCH lighter than the second (begins at a party and the events of the party gets the teens into trouble that leads to a life altering event). Would that be a problem ? Also Should I include the dark life altering event of the second half of the MS in my query?
— Anonymous

It sounds like a problem. It sounds like possibly the book doesn’t start in the right place, but of course I haven’t read it and I suppose it could work. Unfortunately I can’t answer this because it’s so specific.

20
Aug
Should I use a book that isn't popular as a comp title. Have you come across comps that you are unfamiliar with,and does that affect if you want to request an MS or not?
— Anonymous

You want to use something we’ve heard of. So something that sold no copies is not a good comp title. If it’s not popular but has won awards then most likely I’ve heard of it and that’s okay.

20
Aug
I read the blog MarcyKate's blog post about offers and I had 2 questions. 1.How do you find out what type of agent a person is.(Ex. editorial) 2. I had no idea an agent can only be interested in one book as opposed to wanting to build a career with an author, does this happen a lot? Bonus question: What kind of agency is team New leaf? Are you looking to build careers with writers?
— Anonymous

1. Ask the agent. Ask their clients.

2. Yes. Some agencies offer representation for one book and if it doesn’t sell after a year, that terminates the relationship. Ask the question—“What happens if we go on submission and the book doesn’t sell?”

Bonus: I’d say we’re pretty long-term career oriented. Recently I posted a query that the lovely Kara Taylor sent me (that prompted me to sign her). We unfortunately never sold that book (even though it was awesome!). I think it wasn’t the right time for it. But we sold her next book (Prep School Confidential), then two more in the series, and then we just recently sold a new book of hers. 

20
Aug
Is it okay to reference popular culture in books.Ex. iphones, books, Miley Cyrus, other celebrities, popular clothing stores , trends ,fads etc.
— Anonymous

Yes, but too many do date the book. Just keep that in mind.